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Bentgate Mountaineering

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Scarpa Maestro

Posted by Will Shaw on

Comfort is rarely the first topic of conversation surrounding climbing shoes, but even within the “all-day” category, Scarpa is re-prioritizing to bring comfort to the forefront. Scarpa uses a supportive sole, Eco Leather upper with strategically placed seams, and active randing to craft an all day performance shoe that can handle anything you’ll encounter on the wall. The Maestro is available in a mid and low height with both available in Men’s and Women’s specific models.

Starting with the sole, Scarpa is using 4mm Vibram XS Edge for its support and hold on technical edges. A Talyn midsole helps the Maestro hold its shape. Scarpa calls the Maestro Mid flat, but we find that it has a very slight downturn. A slightly asymmetrical toe box helps to improve technical edging performance and offers a new fit to the comfort category.

Active Randing is Scarpa’s process of pre-stretching parts of the shoe as it is made. This process allows for a precise fit and powerful design without slingshotting the foot into the toe box by wrapping around the heel. At the shop we have found Scarpa’s shoes to be some of the most comfortable even in performance categories because the foot is not grabbed by the achilles and shoved forward to generate performance.

The 2mm Eco Leather that makes the upper portion of the shoe creates a unique fit for the Maestro family. Trying on the Maestro for the first time feels like wearing a comfortable softer slipper with a very supportive sole. The result is a shoe that you can take straight out of the box and head to Zion or Yosemite with almost no break-in time. Just keep in mind that if the Maestro Mid is your first mid or high-top climbing shoe it may take some time for your ankle to get used to being covered.

In addition to using a supple leather for the upper, Scarpa minimizes seams and works to move them away from common pressure points. It’s a subtle change, but stitching is kept off the tops of toes, and the surface under the tongue is clean to keep crack climbing as comfortable as it can be. On the Mid version of the Maestro, the laces are protected all the way up to the ankle to prevent abrasion. The Maestro Low uses the design only on the first few crosses and then switches to a traditional lace pattern to allow the shoe to be cinched more for hard face climbing.

At the shop, we’re excited about the Maestro Mid, but the standard Maestro should not be overlooked. The construction and last are the same, but it uses a softer sole for those who like to feel their foot placements a little more at the cost of some support. We like the Maestro (low) for technical vertical climbing and thin hands to finger cracks.

Both flavors of the Maestro are also available in Women’s specific models. The Women’s specific last uses a lower volume toe box and heel pocket, and on the Mid, the ankle coverage is a little lower to accommodate the women’s foot shape. To our knowledge, the Women’s Maestro Mid is the first women’s mid-height climbing shoe on the market.

Stop by and try these on. We have full size runs of the Men’s and Women’s Maestro Mid with the Maestro (low) on the way this summer. We like the Maestro Mid for long days in Rocky Mountain National Park and trips to Zion and Indian Creek. The Maestro (low) is a great option for a day in Eldorado Canyon or techy vertical routes in Clear Creek.

Shop now: Maestro MidWomen's Maestro Mid

  • Scarpa
  • Maestro mid
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  • Trad Climbing

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